Background

Mods led a fast lifestyle, often working in the week and packing as much excitement as possible into the 60 hours or so at the weekend: much of that time was spent on their feet dancing, including usually all night on Saturday. To achieve this, some of them resorted to drugs.

The stimulant amphetamine was used medically as a pick-me-up or slimming aid, however it was soon seen as an aid to keeping a person awake and active through those long weekends. The craze for amphetamines started in London around 1960 and had spread around the country by 1963. It prompted many robberies from chemists’ shops and the like to satisfy the growing demand on the black market.

Amphetamine or ‘Speed’, especially the varieties known as Purple Hearts, French Blues and Black Bombers, was the drug of choice and fashion among teenagers and became part of the fast, invigorating lifestyle of the Mods.

Through the Drugs (Prevention of Misuse) Act of 1964, amphetamines were reclassified as harder drugs and this caused the price of purple hearts on the street to go up from 6d to 9d each, but it didn’t make a lot of difference to their supply or demand.

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The ‘New’ Dungeon

Closed for Alteration

The Dungeon was open six days a week – it only closed on Thursdays. However, in March 1967, it closed for an extra three days one week, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday; ‘Closed for Alterations’ read the advert.

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Friday March 10th was advertised as the ”Big’ Re-opening Night’ of the ‘New’ Dungeon – ‘now even bigger and better, more dancing room, more of the good things that make the Dungeon ‘The Club’ for dancing people.’ It was also the ‘Midlands ‘NEW’ Leading Scene’ and ‘Full of Surprises’.

Saturday night was an All-Nighter (11.30 pm till 8 am) featuring the Original Drifters. The usual early Saturday evening dancing session was shortened – ‘Owing to the Numerous Phone Calls and Letters from all parts of the country, regarding the Drifters show, Door will now open 11.30’.

After queues to get into the Club, it was soon pretty much packed with a happy, jovial crowd anticipating a night of fun, dance and great music – a night to remember. However, the headlines were correct. It was ‘full of surprises’ and certainly a night to remember – people still talk about it to this day.

An Impression

“At some point during the early hours, I went outside to get a breath of fresh air, to be greeted by the arrival of a double-decker bus and an orderly line of marching policemen arriving at the club. It was a raid!!! They made everyone stay inside the club, with no music and the bright house lights switched on, while they searched every person, then either threw them out onto the streets or, in the case of those who were underage, rang their parents to go down to collect them. I believe the bus was used to search the girls.

“My friend sat on the floor at one stage, only to disturb a jumper under which was hidden a very large pile of pills. We decided to inform the police, who proceeded to search us and throw us out.

“Luckily for us, there was another all-nighter in town that night at the Beachcomber, so we went over there, where Lee Dorsey was performing. Eventually word got back to us that the police had finished and the Dungeon was reopening.

“The place was quite empty by now as most people had gone home, however I seem to remember that the Drifters appeared sometime around 6 or 7 in the morning.

“The next day we were ‘celebrities’ as the raid appeared in the national newspapers, however I doubt it was very successful for the police, as I don’t think many arrests were made.”

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Below, people who were there talk about the night.

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Full of Surprises

“Anyone remember the night it was raided by the drug squad?”

“Yes, I was taken to the police station as I was underage. My parents had to come and collect me. If memory serves the Drifters were on stage that night.”

“I was there, but managed to get out, was only 15, lol x.”

“Is it true that the Original Drifters who were on the night of the ‘raid’ were in fact ‘The Invitations’?”

“Yes, they were. Lots of fake groups around then.”

“Remember ‘The Fabulous Temptations ‘?”

 “The toilets was like a chemist when it was raided.”

“I recall a lot of flushing going on!”

“We were there. I was searched in the police van outside, taken to the station, then home in a police car. As a young girl I worked in a chemist, suffering then with my ‘monthly’. The pharmacist prescribed me with some painkillers in an unmarked bottle (yes you know what’s coming); when I realised it was a raid I panicked, took them out of my bag, my then vanity case, and passed them onto my boyfriend. A crowd of 6 of us had been dancing in a circle as we did then and round went the tablets. Oh no, we had been seen. I admitted to them belonging to me, my boss was informed, away they went to be tested – phew all was well, so was my job.”

“Me and two mates were stood outside having a fag when the police blocked off Stanford Street and we shouted in that it was a raid. We asked a copper if we could go back in to get our coats (we didn’t have a coat) and he told us to f–k off. While we stood outside another mate walked up Stanford Street with coppers rushing passed him and he asked what was happening. We told him it was a raid and he said he had a pocket full of pills in his three-quarter suede coat and we asked him if he had a hole in his pocket and he said he had, so we said pour them out the hole one at a time and we crushed them in the gutter with coppers going passed all the time with no idea what we were doing. Got back in at about 5 o’clock and saw the band.”

“Yes I was there and I have lots of tales.”

“Doubt if you remember any. I think we were, can’t remember going home to Brinsley in Police car. I was possibly locked up.”

“So have I but it would incriminate us. An undercover cop ran over and pinned me to the wall but false name address etc. They were the days.”

“We went down to the Beachcomber to see Lee Dorsey after the ‘raid’, then back to the Dungeon in the small hours. I remember thinking I want my 17/6d worth.”

“17/6!!! I only ever paid 2/6.”

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“That’s what we did as well.”

“So did I – Lee Dorsey at the Beachcomber, then back to the Dungeon to see the ‘Original Drifters’ at about 5:00?”

“Yes I was at the Beachcomber watching Lee Dorsey, an all-nighter I think; we ended up at the bung the night of the raid, parked our Lambrettas on Stamford Street, try doing that today.”

“I was saying the same thing, used to leave my Lambretta all night whilst clubbing. It was always there for going home on, plus you only had to turn fuel on and kick start, never used stealing lock.”

“I was there, got searched in a cop van with a kid from London. They pulled a condom from his pocket and asked him, what’s this for? F–king blowing bubbles mate, was his reply.”

“The police took a load of us to the Guild Hall and there was a typewriter on a desk and one lad started trying to play it like the Small Faces (Plonk Lane I think) and a copper hit him round the head with his truncheon. Happy days.”

“I went home.”

“The Sun referred to us as children … And for ages after we kept singing Stevie Wonder’s ‘A Place in the Sun’! The article said that we were expecting a ‘beat’ group called The Drifters, but instead we got the police!”

“Yes I was there, but had to stay at the headquarters all night for some reason!”

“I remember. It was packed. Should have been a massive night. When the lights went on I remember the noise of all the gear hitting the floor and lads trying to crush into the gents to get rid. Got through the bus I.D. enquiry, fairly quickly, but can’t remember much after that, as my gear kicked about then.”

“I missed the night it was raided: I was saving for a dress from the Birdcage!!”

“Or doing homework.”

“I missed the raid, but that was on Police advice as it was (possibly) me that had told the Police about the things that went on at The Bung, I was a good boy!! … That was a joke by the way; I don’t want anyone chasing me!!”

“I was there , taken away in a police van and searched.”

“I was there , got away though.”

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Keystone Cops

“The police closed the Dungeon down. I escaped the raid.”

“The raid was in March 1967, the Dungeon did not close down until February 1968”

“Oh, thank you for the dates. I did get stopped from going down town for a while. Plus I was courting too.”

“I was there the night of the raid and remember it well.”

“So was I. The Drifters should have been on; it was packed to the rafters. The police looked like the Keystone cops when they came running down the stairs, to my horror one of them was my Mum and Dad’s friend’s son.”

“I remember there were more pills on the floor of the Dungeon than in Boots.”

“I am just wondering if you are the person I went to see the Drifters with when the Dungeon was raided in 1967?”

“I think I am the same one. Did we actually get to see the Drifters?”

“I thought it was you! And no, we didn’t get to see the Drifters.”

“We were all there that night but she was taken away and the Feds phoned her parents to collect her but I went back, nipped to the Beachcomber and then back to the Dungeon.”

“I think we told her parents she was staying at mine because we were 15 at the time, hence us being ‘taken away’!!”

“I went and then for whatever reason myself and my mate decided to get a pass out and then go back later when it was nearer the time the Drifters would do their turn. When we got to the end of Stamford Street, the Police had blocked the end of the road and there was at least two double decker buses parked outside the club. We waited for a bit and then called it a night. Complete washout of an all-nighter. There was an ‘all-dayer’ on the Sunday and it was a bit like a morgue. People were just talking about who Mick Parker had banned because of the drugs. Happy days!”

“Anyone remember if the buses were Lamcote, Camms or Bartons!!!???”

“Thought they were City Transport buses.”

“I can remember the buses but not the company … makes sense it was City Transport, if the raid had been at Beeston Essoldo, then deffo Bartons!!!!!”

“I was thirteen and we young ones went in a police car. Luckily we were about to be searched all over and a police officer came over to us and asked if my mum was called Doris? It was one of my mum’s friends, so she wouldn’t let us be internally searched and took us back home. My mum actually knew I was going and had given me money to go home in a taxi when it finished. Mum wouldn’t let me go there again. And the other two of our group were in trouble with their parents because they’d sneaked out.”

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Anniversary

“The raid was 50 years ago tonight!!!!”

“I remember it like it was yesterday.”

“Remember it well, but can’t remember last week.”

“Think we all have a story from that night!”

“Never did get to see The Drifters!”

“Remember it like it was yesterday, though actual yesterday’s a bit of a blur. Think that night was the last time I went to the Dungeon, went and did a daft thing, got married.”

“I was in Manchester that night or I would certainly have got busted. I never went back. My Dad said either go and live at the Dungeon or here, not both.”

“Remember it well. I was on duty that night, frightened us all when the police came bursting in and then sealed all the exits. We were all searched in units they brought in and parked on Stanford Street.  If my memory serves me right, nothing was found illegally.”

“Remember it well. Will never forget spending a night at the cop shop.”

“We were almost last to be taken out to the bus. Going to the toilet was interesting to say the least. Had to leave the door open with the female cop watching on to make sure nothing extra was getting flushed!”

“I got on the bus to be searched and this voice behind said “what you doing here” or words to that effect; it was my Mum & Dad’s friend’s son, who was on city police. I nearly died.”

“Me and my mate got on the bus and one of the fellas, to be nameless right now, had given my mate his wallet to take care of. Cop lady checked it out and said she had some nice friends after finding his condom! … At least that’s all that was in there!!”

“I had a pair of scissors and a cut throat razor in my bag; my boyfriend was a hair dresser at Stanley Dennis and didn’t leave them in the salon. He’d come straight from work, took some explaining.”

“So when the cops were done with us, we didn’t have a clue where everybody had gone so walked up to the square and found a crowd by the bogs. Probably towards 6 am by then. Somebody said it was over and the Drifters were coming back. Great except it wasn’t ‘our’ Drifters – it was the Original Drifters – all different fellas. They may have been good but not for us we wanted to hear Johnny Moore!!!”

“I remember the raid I was there. They lined us all up outside.”

“They looked like the Keystone cops when they came running down the stairs.”

“Had my first Stag night at the Dungeon, raided for drugs, lined up outside, searched, then wandered off to the Beach, can’t remember who was on though.”

“My stag night, took all the guys from work, a motor sales in Derby. They threatened to kill me on the following Monday morning.”

“Best bit for me, my mam always knew we were going to all-nighters, thumbing lifts to the Mojo etc etc. She cut out all the clips from our newspapers about the raid. Still got them.”

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Raid on …

“I hadn’t been to the Dungeon for a while (started going to the Beachcomber) and a friend wanted to go to see the Drifters … so pleased to have been part of the story that is still talked about 50 years later … think a film should be made – not ‘Raid on Entebbe’ but ‘Raid on Stanford Street’ … I wonder who would play the leading roles !!???????”

“I was there that night working in the cloakroom and my late hubby was on the door; never forget it.”

“Left just before it happened. Phew!”

“I was there … my parents weren’t happy having to collect me from the police station!”

“I was with two friends. Taken home in police car from station.”

“I was there and had to wait at the bottom of Stanford Street near Woolworths until the Police said we could go back and was one of the first in. What a memory will live with me forever …”

“Spent the night in the nick!!!”

“As I mentioned earlier I had a lucky escape that night as I was in Manchester but events caught up with me the following Saturday when I was arrested at a football match in London. Unfortunately I was searched …!”

“I was there with friends wondering why, and I still don’t know why, they raided a first rate club with nothing but young people enjoying music of the times & friends having a GREAT TIME!!!”

“Taken away in the bus!!”

“I remember looking at the floor when the lights came on and seeing all the smarties ha ha!!”

“I was supposed to be there but ended up at a party in Beeston!”

“I was there with mates. Still tell the story to this day. Great times live forever thanks to the Dungeon.”

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Talk of the Town

“I am amazed. At Sebring Florida talking to a fella from Wales and he knows about the raid from BBC World News. Wow.”

“We were quite famous then. The News spread everywhere.”

Mick Parker, Pauline Peck, Dot Porter in the coffee bar
Mick Parker, Pauline Peck, Dot Porter in the coffee bar

By Monday, the night was being reported on television and in the national newspapers. Here is how it was reported in Nottingham’s Guardian Journal on Monday March 13th 1967.

Street barricaded as 600 teenagers are searched

DRUGS SWOOP ON CLUB

100 Police break up city pop session

By a Guardian Journal reporter

Six hundred teenagers were ordered out of an all-night pop group session at a Nottingham club and searched in the early hours of yesterday when 100 police swooped in an anti-drug raid.

The 2 a.m. raid was on the Dungeon Club in Stanford Street, Greyfriar-gate.

It was the first major operation in the City Police programme of stamping out drug peddling in Nottingham.

Vice-squad and CID men closed in on the club as an all-night dance session was in full swing. Both ends of the street were barricaded and 100 police put a cordon round the club.

Mobile offices

Mobile police offices and vans were set up as interrogation centres and the teenagers were shepherded into the street to await questioning and searching.

The police raiding party included 20 police women led by P.w. Insp. Madge Davies.

The raid was led by Supt. William Sanday and Chief Insp. Jack Meldrum who had with them a search warrant issued under the Dangerous Drugs Act.

The teenagers stood under close guard in the street until the inquiries were complete at about 5 a.m.

Police used vans and a bus in addition to the club premises as interviewing centres.

A police spokesman said that tablets and pills found in the club and in the possession of some of the dancers were seized and were submitted for forensic examination to determine if they were illegal drugs.

Treated

More than 60 young people who were under the age of 17 were taken to City Police headquarters as a place of safety until arrangements could be made for them to be seen home.

“Many of them lived outside the city and some came from places as far away as Northampton and London,” said the spokesman.

One 18-year old youth was taken to hospital for treatment after he had admitted having taken a number of ‘French Blues’.

He was not seriously ill and was allowed to leave after treatment.

The police spokesman said that this was a firm attempt by the police to stamp out drug taking in Nottingham.

Some of the tablets collected in the raid may not turn out to be dangerous in themselves but they had been found to be the ‘beginning of the road’ to taking more advanced habit-forming drugs.

The drugs would be analysed at the Forensic Science Laboratory before any summonses were issued.

Parents told

For dancers who had come from distant places, arrangements had been made to notify the police in their own towns, or their parents, to ensure they reached home safely.

A teenage girl who was at the club when it was raided said that it came as a “complete bombshell.”

“Everything was swinging and we were all dancing when suddenly there were police everywhere,” she said.

She added that they were told to go out into the street and had to stand there until their turn came to be interviewed. She said that she was searched thoroughly.

Another girl said that she had, on occasions, seen pills peddled in clubs and coffee houses in the city. She said that they were fairly easily obtainable and sometimes they were “offered to you if you seemed interested.

“You need some kind of pep if you want to stay awake through an all-night session,” she said.

Another teenager who was in the club, dancing at the time, said that the police ushered everyone out into the street.

“I had left my coat behind and wanted to go back for it. But the police insisted that I should be accompanied by a constable,” said the youth.

He added that the girls were segregated from the boys for searching and questioning in the mobile offices.

At a session at the club yesterday afternoon an 18-year-old Bulwell girl, who had been at the club during the raid, said that names, addresses and ages were taken.

“I was searched, some were stripped, but they only looked through my pockets and coat.

“I had got some tablets for hangovers that a friend had given me. Even now I don’t know if they were drugs. They were four pink capsules in a tube which said: ‘One to be taken after a night out.’

“Another girl from Northampton had stomach tablets,” she added.

Well behaved

An 18-year-old Bestwood Park bot said that they had to wait at the barricades while people were interviewed until 5 a.m. Then many of them returned into the club to hear the Original Drifters play.

Mr W.M. Parker, owner of the club, said that the police had commented on the good behaviour of the young people during the whole operation.

The draw of the top-line American group, The Original Drifters, resulted in a large number of teenagers gathering outside the club before the scheduled opening time at 11.30 p.m.

Mr Parker decided that to prevent any complaint about the noise in the street, he would open a little earlier than proposed.

The youngsters poured in from all over the country to see the famous group. Supporting groups had been playing for a time.

Had warrant

It was after 2 a.m. and the atmosphere was building up for the entrance of the stars. Mr Parker made his way to the cloakroom near the door to arrange for the arrival of the group.

Instead, the door opened and plain-clothed CID men and uniformed police officers thrust their way in.

“As soon as I realised who they were I went upstairs and saw Ch. Insp. Meldrum, who explained that he had a warrant to search my premises.

“I told him I’d co-operate in any way, shape or form. But I told him I was very surprised they had a warrant. I had told them at different times before that they had an open invitation to do anything they wished.”

Mr Parker made an announcement to the dancers asking them to remain orderly and they were ushered out into the street and down to one end, which had been barricaded by police vehicles.

The Original Drifters had to wait outside during the raid and their road manager was taken for interviewing.

‘Decent kids’

“There are a lot of decent kids down here,” Mr Parker told a Guardian Journal reporter yesterday.

“At New Year’s Eve, I caught someone trying to sell some tablets. I didn’t know what they were, but I took him straight to the police headquarters.

“I told the fellow I would not tolerate this sort of thing in my club and handed him over to the police. They are now prosecuting this fellow.

“If I find anybody with drugs I hand them over to the police.”

He said that there was always an open invitation to parents of members to inspect the premises by walking round.

“There has been a lot of bad publicity up and down the country about clubs without proper facilities such as adequate toilets, fire escapes and emergency lighting.

Frightened

“There is a Bill going through Parliament at the moment to licence all clubs of this nature eventually. This would be a very good thing.

“It will mean the police will have the right of admission. Where the trouble stems from is that many clubs won’t allow police in because they are frightened and might have something to hide.

“When we have sessions every Friday, Saturday and Sunday I engage a policeman through the local authority more or less to be on hand to keep out people we don’t wish in – non-members.”

He said that he was always prepared to allow police access to any part of the club and from time to time policewomen visit the premises looking for girls missing from home.

Unlicensed

The club, which has been open three years, is unlicensed and caters for teenagers and young people up to about 21 years.

Mr Parker said: “It is not designed for adult attendance. It is designed to attract teenagers in their particular way. The image of the club is slowly changing. The kids are changing and wanting a smarter type of club.”

Last week the club was closed for alterations, costing several hundred pounds.

New ventilation, new seating and lighting have been installed and more alterations are planned.

Guardian Journal, Nottingham, Monday, March 13th, 1967

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Tests

A similar article appeared in the Nottingham Evening Post on the evening of Monday March 13th 1967.

Evening Post - Raid 5

Club raid biggest yet by city police

LAB. TESTS ON TABLETS HAUL

600 teenagers await results …

Scientific tests being carried out today on tablets and pills seized at the Dungeon Club, Nottingham, in yesterday’s raid – the biggest of its kind so far by city police, will decide whether any of the 600 teenagers searched will be prosecuted. “The drugs must be analysed before any summons can be issued,” said a police spokesman.

The results of tests on the tablets and pills were expected to be known by tomorrow or Wednesday, the spokesman said.

Some 600 teenagers were ordered out of the club, in Stanford Street, Greyfriar-gate, when 100 policemen and policewomen swooped at 2 a.m. The teenagers were taken outside and questioned and searched in groups of three in the mobile police office and bus which were waiting outside.

The street was barricaded and a cordon put round the club as the police, led by Supt. William Sanday and Chief Insp. Jack Meldrum, searched for drugs. The two senior officers had with them a search warrant issued under the Dangerous Drugs Act.

Praise

The police spokesman praised the teenagers for their conduct during the raid, saying: “Almost without exception they co-operated very well with the police, and their behaviour was quiet and orderly.

“This was in spite of the fact that many of them must have been very disappointed at having to wait several hours to see the pop group, the Original Drifters.

“We were agreeably surprised at their conduct, and have no complaints to make. The owner of the club also co-operated very well.”

The club is owned by Mr W M Parker.

The raid was the first major operation in the City Police programme of stamping out drug peddling in Nottingham.

Vice squad and CID men closed in on the club as an all-night dance session was in full swing.

The police raiding party included 20 policewomen, led by P.w Insp. Madge Davies.

The teenagers stood under close guard in the street until the inquiries were complete at about 5 a.m.

More than 60 young people who were under the age of 17 were taken to City Police headquarters as a place of safety until arrangements could be made for them to be seen home.

“Many of them lived outside the city and some came from places as far away as Northampton and London,” said the spokesman.

One 18-year-old youth was taken to hospital for treatment after he had admitted having taken a number of ‘French Blues’.

He was not seriously ill and was allowed to leave.

Of the teenagers searched in the raid, police said that nine were from London, 10 from Northampton, three from Lincoln, and others were from Mansfield, Sutton-in-Ashfield, Ilkeston, West Hallam, Ripley and other parts of Derbyshire.

For dancers who had come from distant places, arrangements had been made to notify the police in their own towns, or their parents, to ensure they reached home safely.

A teenage girl who was at the club when it was raided said that it came as a ‘complete bombshell’.

“Everything was swinging and we were all dancing when suddenly there were police everywhere,” she said.

She added that they were told to go out into the street and had to stand there until their turn came to be interviewed. She said that she was searched thoroughly.

Another girl said that she had, on occasions, seen pills peddled in clubs and coffee houses in the city. She said that they were fairly easily obtainable and sometimes they were “offered to you if you seemed interested.

“You need some kind of pep if you want to stay awake through an all-night session,” she said.

At a session in the club yesterday afternoon an 13-year-old Bulwell girl, who had been at the club during the raid, said that names, addresses and ages were taken.

“I was searched, some were stripped, but they only looked through my pockets and coat.

“I had got some tablets for hangovers that a friend had given me. Even now I don’t know if they were drugs. They were four pink capsules in a tube which said: ‘One to be taken after a night out’.”

Mr Parker said there was always an open invitation to parents of members to inspect the premises by walking round.

He said that he was always prepared to allow police access to any part of the club, and from time to time policewomen visit the premises looking for girls missing from home.

The club, which has been open three years, is unlicensed, and caters for teenagers and young people up to about 21 years.

Nottingham Evening Post, Monday March 13th, 1967

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A Place in the Sun

Another article was printed in one of the National newspapers, the cutting exists but there is no mention of the paper. The article was written by Ellis Plaice.

DRUGS: CID HOLD SIXTY CHILDREN

About 600 youths and girls were searched by police in a drug-hunting raid on a beat-music club early yesterday.

Sixty children aged under seventeen were taken away from the club – the New Dungeon in Nottingham.

They spent the rest of the night at Nottingham police headquarters, waiting for their parents to collect them.

Parents as far afield as London, Birmingham and Northampton were woken by the police and asked to fetch their children.

Some older teenagers also went to police headquarters for further questioning.

The New Dungeon Club, with a ground floor and basement in Stanford Street, Nottingham, had opened at the weekend. It was advertised as ‘The Midlands’ New Leading Scene’.

Advertisements also promised that the club would be ‘Full of Surprises’.

The big surprise of Saturday night’s dusk-till-dawn song-and-dance session came at 1.45 a.m.

The teenagers were expecting a beat group called The Drifters. Instead, 100 policemen and policewomen pounced.

The police had warrants under the Dangerous Drugs Act.

Streets around the club were blocked. When the Drifters arrived, they had to wait outside the club.

Hospital

The 600 youths and girls were led three-by-three to a police bus and vans, for searching and questioning.

One 18-year-old boy was taken to hospital suffering from a suspected drug overdose.

A police spokesman said later yesterday: “The club has not been closed. Charges against some youngsters are possible, once we receive laboratory reports.”

Club owner Michael Parker, 28, said last night: “If any parents doubt this is a respectable club for respectable teenagers, they are quite entitled to come and see for themselves.”

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